Technical Program Managers Innovate, Lead, and Solve Complex and Interdependent Technology Problems

The days when a “large IT project” effectively meant “enterprise-wide system installation” are long gone. Businesses today deploy large scale systems using services and micro services throughout their organizations. With systems being woven together in a complex tapestry, technology projects and initiatives demand incredibly precise coordination, especially to make large scale changes.

Fortunately, the Technical Program Manager (TPM) role has evolved to meet this need. TPMs combine superb technical skills with program/project/process management skills to dig into thorny, critical issues and lead teams to solve large and complex technical problems.

AIM Consulting Facilitates Rapid Deployment of Box with Data Migration from Legacy Document Management System

Case Study: Delivery Leadership SITUATION & BUSINESS CHALLENGE A large financial services and communications company needed to migrate content from a legacy file-sharing and cloud-based document management system that was being retired by the vendor. The company’s existing license for

AIM Consulting Delivers Technical Program Management to Solve Systemic Incident Response Issue at Global Online Travel Company

Case Study: Delivery Leadership SITUATION & BUSINESS CHALLENGE A multi-billion dollar global online travel company had tremendous difficulty identifying and resolving incidents with its service applications. This resulted in a poor user experience, including interruption to business transactions, for the

AIM Upgrades Holland America Line’s Check-In Experience with Modern, Scalable AngularJS Application

Case Study: Application Development | Project Delivery SITUATION & BUSINESS CHALLENGE Holland America Line (HAL) is a recognized leader in the cruise industry, with a fleet of 14 modern ships offering more than 500 cruises to more than 400 ports

Using Scrum to Adopt Agile

Since the publishing of the Agile Manifesto in the early 2000s, organizations have experienced tremendous benefits from adopting agile, including transparency, predictable delivery, and better quality. Agile has generated such a positive impression that it has increasingly been used for non-development-related projects, for everything from managing marketing projects to transforming an entire practice.

For organizations excited to make the transition to agile, the promise is sweet but the reality can be bitter. Organizations unfamiliar with agile processes can face significant challenges, and when projects stall or fail due to lack of understanding or poor implementation, agile gets the blame. To make the transition to agile more smoothly, some organizations have found success with a tactic I like to call “using Scrum to adopt agile.” This concept can be applied with a variety of methodologies (Lean, Kanban, etc.), but as Scrum is well-known and highly regarded, I will use it to illustrate how this is done.

What is a PMO and How Do You Know If You Need One?

If your technology department’s projects run behind schedule, over budget, or do not bring the value to the organization that was intended, you are not alone. According to a survey by McKinsey & Company, on average, large IT projects run 45 percent over budget and 7 percent over time, while delivering 56 percent less value than predicted. Quite stunningly, 17 percent of IT projects go so far off track that they can threaten the very existence of a company.

A project management office (PMO) can help you avoid these issues or address them if they’re already being faced. A PMO is a team within an organization that defines the processes, best practices, methods, and tools used during project execution and drives projects to completion. PMOs can also assist project prioritization and recommend and implement options to help ensure on-time delivery.

Large E-Commerce Retailer Leverages AIM Consulting for Agile Transformation

Case Study: Delivery Leadership SITUATION & BUSINESS NEEDS A parent company of more than a dozen e-commerce retail brands had recently merged with a company that operated eleven retail brands, forming a powerful partnership in the e-commerce sector. Following the

Finding Strong Scrum Resources in a Less than Standardized World

More and more companies are turning to Agile to improve their project success rates and scrum is the most popular methodology. The problem is that as you transition your company to a scrum environment it is a challenge to find candidates with a legitimate scrum background. Due to the flexibility of scrum and the eagerness of many to obtain scrum experience, a lot of the resources are not actually qualified to work within a scrum team, especially in transitioning environments.

That may sound a bit negative, but I’ve seen a lot of scrum team candidates in my time. After interviewing a scrum business analyst candidate claiming five years of experience who couldn’t tell me what a “story” was, I’ve become skeptical. So how do you find the right people who are going to move your company forward?

Finding Strong Scrum Resources in a Less than Standardized World on Scrum Alliance

More and more companies are turning to Agile to improve their project success rates, and Scrum is the most popular method. The problem is that as you transition your company to a Scrum environment, it is a challenge to find candidates with a legitimate Scrum background. Due to the flexibility of Scrum and the eagerness of many to obtain Scrum experience, many people are not actually qualified to work within a Scrum team, especially in transitioning environments.

Finding Strong Scrum Resources in a Less than Standardized World on Scrum Alliance

More and more companies are turning to Agile to improve their project success rates, and Scrum is the most popular method. The problem is that as you transition your company to a Scrum environment, it is a challenge to find candidates with a legitimate Scrum background. Due to the flexibility of Scrum and the eagerness of many to obtain Scrum experience, many people are not actually qualified to work within a Scrum team, especially in transitioning environments.

Are you a technology expert?
Learn more about being an
AIM Consultant →

 

Retail Mobile App Success White Paper